Comprehensive Pain Management
(Formally known as Franklin Pain and Wellness and Warwick Pain)

Attleboro, MA(508) 236-8333
Franklin, MA(508) 507-8818
South Kingstown, RI (401) 234-9677
Warwick, RI(401) 352-0007

Franklin, MA • (508) 507-8818
Warwick, RI • (401) 352-0007
South Kingstown, RI • (401) 234-9677

Franklin Pain and Wellness Center

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Treating Chronic Arthritis Pain

Joseph Coupal - Friday, October 19, 2018
Comprehensive Pain Management - Franklin, MA

Chronic pain – a common problem for people with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions like fibromyalgia – doesn’t just hurt. It can drain your ability to work, enjoy life and be active. Often, it leads to ongoing problems with sleep, fatigue, depression and anxiety. These factors interconnect, such that difficulties with any of them make the others worse.

People with arthritis can have both acute and chronic pain. Acute pain happens when you have an active injury; it lasts for days or weeks until the injury is healed. Chronic pain persists for three months or longer.

Ongoing disease can cause ongoing pain. If inflammation in the joints continues and is not controlled, individuals can continue to experience pain, from the inflammation itself, the damage it’s causing or both.

Treatment

Getting arthritis under control is the first step in treating chronic pain. The next is working with your doctors and other specialists to develop a comprehensive pain management plan targeting the unique factors influencing your chronic pain.

Pain is often multifactorial in origin. Thus, it is important for physicians to separately identify each possible cause of pain, rather than assuming all pain is a symptom of the rheumatic disease.

In addition to arthritis medications, such a plan might include drugs or other treatments designed specifically to treat pain, sleep or mood; complementary or alternative therapies; and talk therapy.

Improve sleep. Sleep problems are common among people with rheumatic diseases. Pain can disturb sleep, and vice versa. Practicing good sleep hygiene – avoiding caffeine, alcohol and screen time before bed, for example – can improve sleep.

Track pain and its effects. Keeping track of when pain strikes and how it affects you may help you and your doctor pinpoint causes and solutions. You can use a notebook or one of the many available online tools or smartphone apps.

Work on the mind-body connection. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) – talk therapy aimed at changing negative thought patterns – can ease chronic pain in arthritis and fibromyalgia. Mind-body activities, such as tai chi or yoga, may also reduce discomfort in people with musculoskeletal conditions.

Consider a multidisciplinary plain clinic. Although a rheumatologist or primary care physician can often help manage pain, some people need more specialized care. If pain is still running your life after working closely with your doctor to improve it, consider a consult with experts at a multidisciplinary pain clinic.

These clinics offer a range of interventions and complementary treatments. For more information on treating chronic arthritis pain, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in Franklin, MA.

Source: arthritis.org

Sources of Arthritis Pain

Joseph Coupal - Friday, October 05, 2018
Comprehensive Pain Management - Franklin, MA

Different types of arthritis can cause different types of pain.

Arthritis and related diseases can cause debilitating, life-changing pain. More than one-third of the adults who have arthritis report that it limits their leisure activities and work. And 25 percent of them say it causes severe pain (seven or higher on a zero to 10 point scale).

There are more than 100 different forms of arthritis and related diseases. The most common types include osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), fibromyalgia and gout. All of them cause pain in different ways.

Osteoarthritis

In osteoarthritis (OA), the protective cartilage inside the joint breaks down. This makes movement of affected joints more difficult and painful. In time, bones of the joint may rub directly against one another, causing severe pain. Pain can also come from parts of your joint other than the cartilage, such as bone, synovium and ligaments. The intensity of OA pain varies from person to person and can range from mild to severe.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the joints and other organs are attacked by the body’s own immune system. The immune system normally protects a person from viruses, bacteria and other invaders. In people with autoimmune diseases like RA, it becomes overactive and attacks healthy tissue. In the case of RA, the immune system primarily goes after the lining of the joints, called the synovium. Over time, the persistent inflammation breaks down the joint and damages it permanently.

Pain in RA can come from other parts of your joint besides the synovium, such as bone and ligaments.

Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease in which the immune system attacks the body, causing inflammation and pain. PsA affects the joints, causing arthritis; the connective tissue where tendons or ligaments attach to bones, causing enthesitis; and the skin, causing psoriasis.

Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is considered a central pain syndrome. This means that the brain and spinal cord process pain signals differently. A touch or movement that doesn’t cause pain for others may feel painful to you (this is called allodynia). Something that is mildly painful to someone without fibromyalgia may hurt you even more (this is called hyperalgesia).

Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain. It may come and go or be constant. Besides pain, fibromyalgia is associated with other symptoms, such as fatigue, sleep problems, inability to concentrate and mood troubles.

Gout

Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis, but it does not cause body-wide inflammation like RA or PsA does. In gout, uric acid crystals are the problem. If your body produces too much uric acid or if you are unable to remove the excess fast enough, it can build up in the blood (called hyperuricemia). Excess uric acid can form crystals in your joints. This results in extremely painful joint inflammation. Gout usually strikes in the large joint of the big toe, but can also affect other joints. With a gout flare, you can go to bed feeling fine and wake up with excruciating pain.

Lupus

Lupus is an autoimmune inflammatory disease that affects many parts of the body, including the joints, kidneys, skin, blood, brain and other organs. It can cause joint pain, fatigue, hair loss, sensitivity to light, fever, rash and kidney problems.

Back Pain

Back pain can be a symptom of several forms of arthritis and related conditions, including ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and fibromyalgia. Most back pain, however, is the result of some type of injury, such lifting or bending improperly, a sports injury or an automobile accident.

Other Musculoskeletal Pain

Soft-tissue rheumatic conditions can also cause pain. In these conditions, muscles, connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments, and bursae become inflamed and painful.

For more information on treating arthritis pain, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in Franklin, MA.

arthritis.org


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